biggoose - native american indian art - indian artwork - native indian art - native american artwork - native american painting - native american print - native american tshirt - native american t-shirt NATIVE AMERICAN INDIAN ART ORIGINALS by: biggoose - native american indian art - indian artwork - native indian art - native american artwork - native american painting - native american print - native american tshirt - native american t-shirt

- Native American Artistbiggoose - native american indian art - indian artwork - native indian art - native american artwork - native american painting - native american print - native american tshirt - native american t-shirt

Mars Biggoose passed on to the next world January 23, 2000, after his fight with Cancer. 

Mars' life was as unique as the person.  He once told me, "I paint just one thought for a painting and that's all.  I don't put in a bunch of fillers like clouds and trees. I want the person to see just the thought of the painting- the story is just exactly what you see.".

Mars painted in a flat, two dimensional style that blended the traditional, spiritual, and surreal that has been described as ethereal. His favorite medium was Gouache, a watercolor medium that allowed him to develop his style of muted and pastel colors. 

The following history was composed by the artist:

I am Marcellus (Mars) Biggoose, I am "He-Zee-Nah-Zhee", (Young Buffalo) of the Ponca Tribe.

When I was 6 years old, the Federal Government took me from my family and sent me to the Pawnee Indian School in Pawnee, Oklahoma. The government closed the school in 1958 and I was transferred to the Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas. 

At that time the Institute was a high school and vocational training center. I dropped out of school in 1960 and wandered quite  a bit until 1964.  I had always enjoyed drawing and thought I would learn more about my craft if I attended the Institute of  American Indian Arts, in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  While there I studied under the guidance of Allen Houser, (Apache).  However, I was still not ready to learn and left after one year, (1964-65). 

I continued to wander and moved to Enid, Oklahoma.  I had learned of an art contest held at the library (1966).  I decided I would enter the contest and I won First Place. 

During this time I became friends with the librarian.  She told me of a woman in Muskogee, Oklahoma who might be interested in my art work. She arranged an introduction for me to Nettie Wheeler.  Before  our first meeting I was encouraged to arrange a selection of paintings of various themes that I enjoyed. 

I painted around 20 paintings and proudly presented myself to  Nettie.  As she looked at each painting, she  began throwing the paintings at me one at a time and kept asking me, "Who are you?" and I kept answering "Mars, Biggoose". Finally she ran out of paintings, but was still asking, "Who are you?"  I was now at a loss for words and just shrugged my shoulders.  Nettie yelled, "Are you a white man?" "No." I replied. "I'm Indian". Nettie looked at me and said with a firm voice, "Then paint like an Indian---show your beliefs, values, and what is important to you, Mars,  Biggoose---an Indian." 

That was the last time I painted non-Indian themes.  Nettie Wheeler was a wonderful person. I have been with her when an artist would bring her a "rough looking" painting and ask her if she would buy the painting.  I knew she didn't want that painting, but she would buy it anyway. The money was for a good purpose--food or gas. She knew the money might be used in other ways, but she still supported the artists.  I lost a strong supporter of my work when she passed on in the 70's.

Since her passing I have continued on my own way. My paintings always reflect the symbolism of the Native American "spirituality".  The person represented in my painting is constantly searching for guidance and understanding of the challenges of life.  For the Native American this is done through prayer. The paintings are also a reflection of myself, for I am always trying to keep my "Center" and honor the "Circle".  The "White Buffalo" provides us strength and survival. When I paint the majestic bald eagle this represents protection and courage  for me. Sometimes my paintings will reflect a yearning for the past that will never return to this world.  

If you have followed American History you may have read about my great-great-grandfather, Chief Standing Bear. Chief Standing Bear sued George Crook, (Brigadier General in the Army), and the United States for not allowing the Indians the same rights as American citizens. The judge did not decide this question, but held the Indian as a person within the meaning of the law and had rights as a citizen in 1879.  My grandmother was the last to wear a blue dot on her forehead and a cross on top of her hand, symbolizing a Princess in the traditional ways.  My grandfather, Augustus, "Gus" McDonald, was the first World Champion Fancy Dancer.  

I will continue to paint as long as Our Father will allow, for I now know he gavebiggoose - native american indian art - indian artwork - native indian art - native american artwork - native american painting - native american print - native american tshirt - native american t-shirt me a special gift. 

All artwork on this site created by 
Biggoose
- Native American Artist

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Native American Originals sells the highest quality native american artwork. All indian artwork was designed by Biggoose, native american artist. The Native American Indian art can be purchased as a Native American print, or if you prefer, can also be purchased as a Native American tshirt. If wearing a Native American t-shirt isn't quite your style, then a Native American painting may look great on your wall.

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